Social Entrepreneurship is cool! I like this piece by JC Lewis


Praise, critique and advice are the daily dialogue of the workplace. Compliments are cool because they make you feel good. Criticism makes you good enough to deserve the compliments. Advice makes you wise enough to keep both in perspective.
Whether your social venture is spiraling downwards or hockey sticking upwards (pursuant to your business plan’s outsized revenue forecast), the right advice at the right time is either enormously helpful or unhelpful. The conundrum is the impossibility of segregating the good advice from the bad advice if you don’t solicit it in the first place.
Group think is a certain sign you need outside advice. The likelihood that your leadership team – and friendship circle, fraternal order, political caucus or book club – will homogenize a set of assumptions into unchallenged conventional wisdom is well-documented. Get outside your bubble.
Your cause, your mission and your social enterprise should be more important to you than your fear of admitting your knowledge/wisdom gaps. ‘Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear,’ noted Ambrose Redmoon, Sixties psychedelic rock band manager and hippie.
The purpose of asking for and getting advice is outside perspective. Ideally, you will learn things you hadn’t thought of. If the advice is honest enough (and who wants dishonest advice?), it will incorporate criticism and concrete suggestions which might make you uncomfortable. If you want only positive feedback, you’re not a social entrepreneur.” 
(snippet from my book rough draft)
Your thoughts?
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No-Name BookAfter 10 years of social entrepreneuring, I’m taking a stab at writing a book about social change and social justice. It’s time to share my ignorance. Send me your thoughts, readings, input and wisdom. I’m perfectly open to the possibility that, while I am very interested in what I think, what I think might not be book-worthy. Photo CreditEntrepreneur online magazine.

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